MnWRL Collection

Primary tabs

Pages


Spatial and temporal variability of preferential flow in a subsurface- drained landscape in North-Central Iowa.
Spatial and temporal variability of preferential flow in a subsurface- drained landscape in North-Central Iowa.
Yes, Abstract, Preferential flow can have a direct impact on agricultural chemical transport, especially where preferential flow allows a significant fraction of the total rainfall to quickly move to underlying subsurface drains. The spatial and temporal variability of preferential flow was studied from 2006-2008 in a 38.8 hectare row-cropped (corn, soybeans) agricultural field with two topographically-located subsurface drains (north-central Iowa). Continuous measurements of water levels, soil moisture, stream and drain discharge, stream and drain specific conductance (SC) and precipitation were obtained. Persistent, but variable preferential flow was found to exist at the study site throughout the growing season. Four independent mathematical approaches were used to explore the spatial and temporal variability of preferential flow. A specific conductance end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) was performed based on the temporally varying SC in the subsurface drain water for two separate events, with 54 events classified solely on decreases in SC without accounting for drain flow (full calculations in supplementary file: SCanalysis.xlsm) . These 54 events were utilized to calculate the mean onset time of preferential flow and the mean time to maximum preferential flow. The maximum water velocity was calculated based on the initial rise of the observed water level relative to rainfall (full calculations in supplementary file: MaxTransportVelocity.xlsx). The highest maximum water velocity values occurred in the early spring and mid-to-late summer (i.e., higher number of preferential flow pathways), and the slowest maximum water velocity in the fall and early summer (i.e., lower number of preferential flow pathways). Spatial and temporal variability of preferential flow was best assessed with maximum water velocity. A simple unsaturated zone, one-dimensional, dual domain model (source-responsive) was conducted based on the timing and magnitude of the change in ground water levels relative to precipitation events (full calculations in supplementary file: S-Rmodel.xlsm). The source-responsive model described the size of the preferential flow space necessary to accommodate preferential flow. Finally, a simple theoretical model of soil infiltration and flow to subsurface drains (DRAIN-Pro), based on the Green-Ampt and Hooghoudt equations, accounted for preferential flow by estimating the effective vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivities., Full text
(Phase I) GIS-Based Sediment Quality Database for the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC) - Help Section for ArcView 3.x Users
(Phase I) GIS-Based Sediment Quality Database for the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC) - Help Section for ArcView 3.x Users
Yes, Summary, In October 2000, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) obtained a grant from the USEPA’s Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) to develop a GIS-based sediment quality database for the St. LouisRiver AOC. MacDonald Environmental Sciences Ltd. (MESL) was retained in April 2001 to assist the MPCA with this effort. A Quality Assurance Project Plan was completed and approved by GLNPO in July 2001 (Crane 2001) so that work could commence on the project. In October 2001, MESL and MPCA staff met with over 60 stakeholders in Duluth and St. Paul to obtain input on the development of this GIS-based database. Stakeholders were asked to identify priority sediment quality indicators, sources of candidate data sets, and key types of GIS data for the St. Louis River watershed (MacDonald et al. 2001). Their input was very useful in producing what should be considered as Phase I of the GIS-based sediment quality database. Additional funding is in the process of being secured to further expand the Microsoft™ (MS) Access 2000 database and ArcView 3.2 projects with additional sediment quality and GIS watershed data. This database, and associated GIS-mapping component, will support the assessment, preservation, and restoration of the lower St. Louis River AOC and adjoining Lake Superior ecosystems. The purpose of this Help Section for ArcView 3.x Users is to provide an overview of the GIS component of this project, as well as general instructions for displaying the GIS data compiled in ArcView 3.2 projects. The Help Section is organized into four chapters and is indexed in such a way as to provide a quick reference guide for users. For more detailed information regarding the content and organization of the GIS-based sediment quality database, users should refer to the accompanying Technical Documentation (Smorong et al. 2003). The Technical Documentation is available upon request by contacting Judy Crane (MPCA) at 651-297-4068 (voice), 651-297-7709 (fax), or judy.crane@pca.state.mn.us (email)., Full text
(Phase I) GIS-Based Sediment Quality Database for the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC) - Help Section for Database Users
(Phase I) GIS-Based Sediment Quality Database for the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC) - Help Section for Database Users
Yes, Summary, The purpose of this Help Section for Database Users is to provide an overview of the MS Access 2000 sediment quality database, as well as general instructions for retrieving data from this database. The Help Section is organized into seven chapters and is indexed in such a way as to provide a quick reference guide for users. For more detailed information regarding the content and organization of the GIS-based sediment quality database, users should refer to the accompanying Technical Documentation (Smorong et al. 2003a). The Technical Documentation is available upon request by contacting Judy Crane (MPCA) at 651-297-4068 (voice), 651-297-7709 (fax), or judy.crane@pca.state.mn.us (email)., Full text
(Site)Prinsco's Profitability Analysis Calculator
(Site)Prinsco's Profitability Analysis Calculator
Summary, https://www.prinsco.com/resources/profitability-analysis-calculator/, Full text, Yes
12 Mile Creek TMDL EPA Approval Letter
12 Mile Creek TMDL EPA Approval Letter
Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) and U.S. EPA's implementing regulations at 40 C.F.R. Part 130 describe the statutory and regulatory requirements for approvable TMDLs. Additional information is generally necessary for U.S. EPA to determine if a submitted TMDL fulfills the legal requirements for approval under Section 303(d) and U.S. EPA regulations, and should be included in the submittal package. Use of the verb must below denotes information that is required to be submitted because it relates to elements of the TMDL required by the CWA and by regulation. Use of the term "should" below denotes information that is generally necessary for U.S. EPA to determine if a submitted TMDL is approvable. These TMDL review guidelines are not themselves regulations. They are an attempt to summarize and provide guidance regarding currently effective statutory and regulatory requirements relating to TMDLs. Any differences between these guidelines and U.S. EPA's TMDL regulations should be resolved in favor of the regulations themselves.""
12-Mile Creek Dissolved Oxygen Total Maximum Daily Load Report
12-Mile Creek Dissolved Oxygen Total Maximum Daily Load Report
This Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) study was completed for 12 Mile Creek (AUID 07010204-681), which is a tributary reach in the North Fork Crow 8 digit Hydrologic Unit (HUC) located in the Upper Mississippi River Basin in Minnesota. The study addresses one dissolved oxygen (DO) impairment. The 12-Mile Creek DO impaired reach watershed covers approximately 61 square miles in Wright County, Minnesota. The predominant land cover types throughout the watershed are corn/soybeans (46%), hay and pasture (23%) and wetlands and open water areas (14%). The goal of this TMDL is to quantify the oxygen demanding pollutant load reductions needed to meet State water quality standards for DO in the impaired reach.
1991 Minnesota Water Research Needs Assessment
1991 Minnesota Water Research Needs Assessment
Summary, WATER RESEARCH IS ESSENTIAL to management and policy decisions made in Minnesota. For research to adequately support management and policy, it must be properly focused on the key questions facing Minnesotans. It must also be adequately and consistently financed. The purpose of this assessment is to help focus research in its support of management and policy. Ultimately, it is also to help the state meet its goals for managing and protecting Minnesota's water resources. The Minnesota Water Plan (MWP) articulates these goals. They are: "To improve and maintain the high quality and availability of Minnesota's water for future generations and long-term health of the environment. "To ensure that our uses of water are sustainable, and that in meeting our needs for water, we recognize its limits and interconnections, accept its changing and variable nature, and adjust our demands upon it when necessary to safeguard it for future needs." Research must allow us to adequately understand and describe the "quality and availability of Minnesota's waters," and the "long-tern health of the environment" It must help us understand water's interconnections and define what "sustainable" might mean in the context of land and water uses. It must help us understand why and how there are limits to these uses., Full text, Yes
1997 Floods in the Red River of the North and Missouri River Basins in North Dakota and Western Minnesota
1997 Floods in the Red River of the North and Missouri River Basins in North Dakota and Western Minnesota
Summary, Record floods devastated many communities along rivers and streams in the Red River of the North (Red River) and Missouri River Basins in North Dakota and western Minnesota during the spring of 1997. Record snowfall over much of the region during the winter of 1996-97 along with added precipitation from a late-spring blizzard on April 5-6, 1997, caused the worst flooding in several areas in more than 100 years. Thousands of people were forced to flee their homes, some permanently, as floodwaters and severe weather caused nearly 2 billion dollars in damages to the region. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), one of the principal Federal agencies responsible for the collection and interpretation of water resources data, works with other Federal, State, and local agencies to ensure that accurate and timely data are available for making decisions regarding the public's welfare (a listing of cooperators in the Red River Basin is given on page 8). This report presents preliminary water-resources data on the 1997 floods that were obtained from selected streamflow gaging stations located in the Red River and Missouri River Basins (fig. 1)., Full text, Yes
1998 Summer Lake Study - Lake Okamanpeedan, Martin County
1998 Summer Lake Study - Lake Okamanpeedan, Martin County
Lake Okamanpeedan, partially located in Martin County, Minnesota, and Emmet County, Iowa, is also known in Iowa as Tuttle Lake. The lake was sampled by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) during the summer of 1998 in order to gather some baseline water quality data. This sampling was designed to assist lake associations, municipalities, or other state agencies in the collection and analysis of water quality data in order to assess the trophic status of the lake.
1999/2000 Minnesota Wetland Report
1999/2000 Minnesota Wetland Report
Summary, As part of the full implementation of the Minnesota Wetland Conservation Act (WCA) in 1994, the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources (BWSR) began to track the Act’s effects on wetland gains and losses in the state, as well as the effects of other state, federal, and local programs. Each year, significant developments impact wetland monitoring and new trends emerge. The numbers collected from 1999 and 2000 support an ongoing trend of WCA serving as a deterrent to projects impacting wetlands. For these two years, about 41 percent of initial landowner inquiries about draining or filling wetlands resulted in project revision to avoid wetlands. Several local WCA managers report informally that potential drain/fill projects are avoided even before a landowner walks in the door. The growing awareness of WCA regulations is causing landowners to consider avoiding existing wetlands even before they finish planning a project. This continues to be one of the Act’s most important successes. Although the number of acres drained or filled each year for WCA-regulated projects varies between about one and three hundred acres, required mitigation always replaces the impacts with more acres than have been lost. Replacement is required via approved plans when wetland draining or filling is unavoidable. Some replacement is performed on-site; otherwise, credits may be purchased from the State Wetland Bank. The Minnesota State Wetland Bank maintains accounts for private credit transactions. Because replacement is mandated at a 2:1 ratio in much of the state, wetland impacts replaced through the bank result in a net gain of wetland acres. In addition to quantity, BWSR works with other state agencies and local entities to improve the quality of the protected resource: upland areas buffer the banked sites from contiguous activity on the land; native, non-invasive plantings help to ensure a stable plant community that can support local wildlife; a renewed emphasis on restrictions and covenants documents ensures the appropriate construction, vegetation, and use of banked wetlands. Currently, BWSR is exploring ways to ensure the long-term viability of bank sites, especially of those that rely on a constructed feature such as a dike or berm, for continued functioning. Tracking WCA and other natural resource program numbers is done largely via the Local Government Annual Reporting System (LARS). Implemented widely in 1998, LARS streamlined statewide data collection, although reporting of local efforts in some categories remains subjective and, in others, incomplete. These inefficiencies, together with a desire to utilize advances in digital technology, prompted BWSR to form a Blue Ribbon Electronic Commerce Committee of local authorities and BWSR staff and specialists. This committee recommended, and BWSR has begun, developing a new system to take special advantage of web availability and GIS technology. BWSR plans to inaugurate this system with the 2003 reporting year. The Road Replacement Program has been popular with local road authorities whose wetland replacement burden for repair or upgrading of existing roads was shifted to BWSR by WCA amendments in 1996. Environmental interests also support the program as it results in higher quality wetland replacement sites. The program requires about $2.35 million in funding per year to meet replacement needs. Although the economies of scale and other efficiencies are clear, continued funding has been uncertain because it requires annual renewal. The legislature approved $2 million during the 2001 special session to fund the program through the end of fiscal year 2002. Wetland replacement for the roads program required about 733 acres for mid-1996 through 1998, 180 for 1999, and 162 for 2000 (an average of about 160 acres per year). BWSR and other state agencies make ongoing efforts to ease compliance with wetland regulations, both at the state level and between the state and federal governments. In particular, BWSR has made progress implementing recommendations outlined in the Minnesota Wetlands Conservation Plan1, as well as the Wetland Mitigation Banking Study completed in 1998. One such accomplishment is the completion of the Native Vegetation guide (see Part VI.C.). Another is a single, joint local/state/federal application form for wetland-related projects of all kinds. Banking and Road Replacement forms are available on the web, as is the list of available banking credits and information about other aspects of the WCA program: www.bwsr.state.mn.us. Another key development was the introduction in January 2000 of a new letter of permission (LOP) process for wetland permitting by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, replacing the old nationwide permitting process. The LOP uses many of the standards contained in WCA, meaning that a project permitted through WCA will generally also be permitted through the Army Corps of Engineers., Full text
2 July 2007 Morehart Farm Dye Trace
2 July 2007 Morehart Farm Dye Trace
Yes, Summary, Our research is designed to delineate springsheds feeding trout streams in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Trout streams are highly dependent on springs discharging large volumes of cool, clear spring water in order to sustain trout populations. Olmsted County is an area of Southeastern Minnesota with mature karst, and as such, the surficial bedrock aquifer is highly vulnerable to pollution and contamination. In particular, highly turbid ground water from storm events can reach springs and thereby adversely affecting trout populations. Fluorescent dye tracing was utilized to delineate springshed areas and conduit connections of springs feeding the east side of Kinney Creek in Pleasant Grove and Orion Townships. In late June 2007 background monitoring was started at selected locations and on 2 July 2007 a double dye trace was initiated by introducing the fluorescent dyes eosin (CAS 17372-87-1) and sulforhodamine B (CAS 3520-42-1) to sinkholes MN55:D0133 and MN55:D0162, respectively. Direct water samples and activated carbon detectors were analyzed by scanning spectrofluorometric methods revealing both introduction points to be in the springshed McConnell's Spring (MN55:A0006). Travel times were faster than three days per kilometer., Full text

Pages

Use of material

Unless otherwise indicated, material from the documents displayed here may not be reproduced without the permission of Minnesota Water Research Digital Library. Please contact mn.wrl@state.mn.us for more information.

Contact us

Minnesota Water Research Digital Library 

625 Robert Street North

Saint Paul, MN 55155-2538

Phone: 651-201-6631 

Email: mn.wrl@state.mn.us