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2001-2003 Minnesota Wetland Report
2001-2003 Minnesota Wetland Report
Summary, Minnesota is blessed with an abundance of wetlands. However, their values and benefits have not always been recognized. Past state and federal encouragement of wetland draining and filling speak to the evolving recognition of the importance of wetlands. Over the past two decades, federal, state, and local activities have increasingly been effective in regulating impacts and restoring previously impacted wetlands. A significant new chapter in wetland management began in Minnesota with passage of the Wetland Conservation Act, also known as WCA, in 1991. The key provision of the WCA is the enactment of the state policy to achieve a “no net loss” and “to increase the quantity and quality and biological diversity” of wetlands in the state. This policy, in M.S. 103A.201, and reads as follows: (1) achieve no net loss in the quantity, quality, and biological diversity of Minnesota's existing wetlands; (2) increase the quantity, quality, and biological diversity of Minnesota's wetlands by restoring or enhancing diminished or drained wetlands; (3) avoid direct or indirect impacts from activities that destroy or diminish the quantity, quality, and biological diversity of wetlands; and (4) replace wetland values where avoidance of activity is not feasible and prudent., Full text
2006 Lake Assessment of Lake Seven (Scalp) (56-0358) Otter Tail County, Minnesota
2006 Lake Assessment of Lake Seven (Scalp) (56-0358) Otter Tail County, Minnesota
Yes, Summary, Lake Seven is located in north-central Otter Tail County within the Otter Tail River watershed. This lake is approximately 2 miles north of Vergas, MN in the North Central Hardwood Forest Ecoregion (NCHF). A lake water quality model was used to estimate the water quality of the lakes based on morphometry and watershed characteristics. This model provides a means to compare the measured water quality of the lake relative to the predicted water quality. The modeling application Minnesota Lake Eutrophication Analysis Procedure (MINLEAP) predicted a summer-mean total phosphorus concentration of 22 μg/L using NCHF ecoregion inputs. This is significantly different than the observed total phosphorus concentration of 9 μg/L for Lake Seven. These results indicated that the water quality of Lake Seven exceeds expected water quality based on MINLEAP (for lakes of similar size, depth, and region of the state)., Full text
2006 Lake Water Quality Monitoring Report
2006 Lake Water Quality Monitoring Report
Summary, Last summer was the tenth year of Hubbard County COLA's lake water monitoring program. Volunteers recorded Secchi disk readings and collected water samples on numerous lakes in Hubbard County. The water samples were sent to RMB Environmental Laboratories, Inc. in Detroit Lakes, MN, for phosphorus and chlorophyll-a tests. Hubbard County COLA's lake monitoring program has been successful over the past 10 years in gathering valuable data for determining lake water quality. Forty-four lakes participate in the program, and over 80% of the lakes are within the average water quality of the ecoregion or better. Four lakes showed significant improvement in water quality over the past 5-10 years, while 12 lakes showed a significant decline in water quality over the past 3-10 years. The remaining lakes that did not show trends are still important to monitor in case future trends develop. This report contains a summary of the current state of Hubbard County COLA lakes and recommendations for future monitoring., Full text, Yes
2007 - 2014 Wetland Monitoring Report
2007 - 2014 Wetland Monitoring Report
Yes, Summary, The purpose of this report is to understand baseline conditions in Capitol Region Watershed District wetlands to better understand the value of each wetland and to inform future management decisions. Described herein are the results from macroinvertebrate and aquatic plant sample collection of 20 major District wetlands from 2007 through 2014. Results were analyzed to calculate the Index of Biological Integrity (IBI) score for both macroinvertebrates and aquatic plants for each survey completed. Additional physical and chemical water quality results from each wetland are also included., Full text
2008 Lake Water Quality Assessment Report for Six McLeod County Lakes
2008 Lake Water Quality Assessment Report for Six McLeod County Lakes
Six lakes in McLeod County, (Silver, Cedar Marion, Hook, Stahl's and Otter) were monitored in 2006 as a part of a study to assess the levels of the blue-green algal toxin, microcystin, in eutrophic Minnesota lakes. Details from that study may be found in Lindon and Heiskary (2007). Cedar, Otter and Marion were also sampled in 2008 to allow for 303(d) assessments of these lakes. All six lakes lie near the transition of the North Central Hardwood Forest and Western Corn Belt Plains Ecoregions. Watershed-to-lake ratios vary from 2:1 (Silver) to >1,000:1 (Otter). Watershed land use is characterized by a mix of land uses with agriculture being prominent in each watershed. All six lakes are considered shallow, with most having 100 percent littoral. As a result, the lakes are generally well-mixed throughout most of the summer, though periodic temporary stratification may occur during warm, calm periods. Dissolved oxygen (DO) frequently falls below 2 milligram per liter (mg/L) near the bottom of the lakes during calm periods and this may help promote internal recycling of phosphorus from the lake sediments. Based on trophic status measures (total phosphorus (TP), chlorophyll-a, and Secchi) all six lakes are considered eutrophic or hypereutrophic. Based on chlorophyll-a concentrations and algal assessments, nuisance blue-green algal blooms were common on these lakes. For most of the lakes, there was minimal long-term data available and no distinct trends over time were evident. Model estimates indicate all lakes have modern-day TP concentrations in excess of background (e.g. pre-European); however, Minnesota Lake Eutrophication Analysis Procedure (MINLEAP) model estimates for Marion, Stahl's and Otter indicate observed TP is equal to or lower than that expected based on lakes with similar morphometric and watershed characteristics in these ecoregions. All six lakes exceed or are near their respective nutrient impairment thresholds, and it is likely Cedar, Marion and Otter will join Hook (listed in 2008) on the 2010 303(d) list for nutrient impairment. Silver and Stahl's may lack sufficient data for the 2010 assessment.
2008 Sentinel Lake Assessment Report Lake Shaokotan (41-0089) Lincoln County, Minnesota
2008 Sentinel Lake Assessment Report Lake Shaokotan (41-0089) Lincoln County, Minnesota
Yes, Summary, The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) is working in partnership with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) on the Sustaining Lakes in a Changing Environment (SLICE) Sentinel Lakes Program. The focus of this interdisciplinary effort is to improve understanding of how major drivers of change such as development, agriculture, climate change, and invasive species can affect lake habitats and fish populations, and to develop a long-term strategy to collect the necessary information to detect undesirable changes in Minnesota Lakes (Valley 2009). To increase our ability to predict the results of alterations to the landscape on lake habitats SLICE utilizes intensive lake monitoring strategies on a wide range of Minnesota lakes. This includes analyzing the relevant land cover and land use, identifying climate stressors, and monitoring the effects on the lake habitat and biological communities. The Sentinel Lakes Program has selected 24 lakes for long-term intensive lake monitoring (Figure 1). Lake Shaokotan was selected to represent a shallow, eutrophic lake in the prairie region of Minnesota. Lake Shaokotan (or Shaokatan, as spelled locally) is a 994-acre lake in west central Lincoln County [note-in deference to MDNR Public Waters Inventory, we will use the Shaokotan spelling throughout the report]. There are two public accesses on the lake: a MDNR maintained access on the north side and a county park access on the southern shore of the lake. Lake Shaokotan is located within the Northern Glaciated Plains (NGP) ecoregion. It has a 100% littoral area with a maximum depth of about 3.4 meters (11 feet) and a mean depth of 2.4 meters (8.0 feet). The total contributing watershed for Lake Shaokotan is 8,817 acres., Full text
2008 Sentinel Lake Assessment Report for Peltier Lake (02-0004) Anoka County, Minnesota
2008 Sentinel Lake Assessment Report for Peltier Lake (02-0004) Anoka County, Minnesota
Yes, Summary, The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) is working in partnership with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) on the Sustaining Lakes in a Changing Environment (SLICE) Sentinel Lakes Program. The focus of this interdisciplinary effort is to improve understanding of how major drivers of change such as development, agriculture, climate change, and invasive species can affect lake habitats and fish populations, and to develop a long-term strategy to collect the necessary information to detect undesirable changes in Minnesota Lakes (Valley 2009). To increase our ability to predict the consequences of land cover and climate change on lake habitats, SLICE utilizes intensive lake monitoring strategies on a wide range of representative Minnesota lakes. This includes analyzing relevant land cover and land use, identifying climate stressors, and monitoring the effects on the lake’s habitat and biological communities. The Sentinel Lakes Program has selected 24 lakes for long-term intensive lake monitoring (Figure 1). Peltier Lake was one of the lakes and represents an example of a shallow eutrophic lake in the North Central Hardwood Forests ecoregion. Peltier Lake is 233 hectares (577 acres) of open water and has a maximum depth of 4.9 meters (16 feet) (MDNR GIS Data Deli 2009). It is located partially in the city of Lino Lakes and partially in the city of Centerville. The lake has a relatively large watershed (part of the Rice Creek watershed), spanning 13 municipalities and three counties (Anoka, Ramsey, and Washington). There is extensive water quality data on the lake as a result of monitoring by Rice Creek Watershed District, Metropolitan Council Environmental Service, citizen volunteers, and MPCA. In addition there have been various studies on Peltier’s fish and wildlife conducted by MDNR and other parties concerned with the overall ecology of the lake. This data and previous reports were used to develop this assessment of Peltier Lake., Full text
2008 Wetland Assessment Documentation
2008 Wetland Assessment Documentation
Yes, Summary, The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) is listing four wetlands on the 2008 TMDL list of impaired waters. In order to be considered for listing these emergent depressional wetlands meet two criteria: (1) biologically impaired as determined by plant and macroinvertebrate indices of biological integrity (IBIs), and (2) hydrologically connected to downstream impaired waters currently on the TMDL list., Full text
2009 Carnelian Marine St. Croix Watershed District WATER MONITORING REPORT
2009 Carnelian Marine St. Croix Watershed District WATER MONITORING REPORT
Yes, Summary, This report focuses on the summary and comparison of the stream water quality/quantity and lake water quality data collected by the Washington Conservation District (WCD) in 2009 and previous monitoring seasons. The Carnelian Marine St. Croix Watershed District (CMSCWD) monitored twenty-eight lakes, six perennial streams, and one lake outlet as part of their 2009 water quality monitoring program (Figure 1). Water quality data collected over the past year provides some observations about the status of the lakes and streams monitored in the CMSCWD., Full text

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